WWI: Fifty two months, fifty two posts – 50 – Smile, Smile, Smile

Wilfred Owen is probably the best know of the WWI poets and his death, which occurred during the Allied attempt to retake the Sambre-Oise Canal just 8 days before the armistice was signed has come to symbolise the dreadful waste of war. Owen wrote the majority of his poems between August 1917 and September 1918. … Continue reading WWI: Fifty two months, fifty two posts – 50 – Smile, Smile, Smile

WWI: Fifty two months, fifty two posts – 41 – Christmas at the Front

I was going to write a post about each of the four Christmases during WWI. However I found that the Imperial War Museum had, unsurprisingly, got there before me, so I will instead direct you to their “Voices of the First World War: Christmas at the Front” which includes a podcast. I will also direct … Continue reading WWI: Fifty two months, fifty two posts – 41 – Christmas at the Front

WWI: Fifty two months, fifty two posts – 22 – Death of a Poet

On May 26, 1915, in a hospital in Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, Julian Grenfell, then a Captain in the Royal Dragoons, died of the wounds he received on 13 May as he stood talking with other officers during operations near Ypres at Hooge . A splinter of shell which had landed near them hit him in the … Continue reading WWI: Fifty two months, fifty two posts – 22 – Death of a Poet

WWI: Fifty two months, fifty two posts – 9 – Gallipoli

I don’t think I can say anything about the anniversary of this disastrous campaign, which was masterminded by Winston Churchill, that hasn’t been said many times over in the past week, and far more eloquently than I could manage. That said, I simply can’t ignore the anniversary. So, as is often my want where emotional situations … Continue reading WWI: Fifty two months, fifty two posts – 9 – Gallipoli

WWI: Fifty two months, fifty two posts – 2 – Scars Upon My Heart

Women’s voices from WWI are often either overlooked or stereotyped – the ever cheerful VADs and Nurses at the front, the stoic, patriotic wives and mothers waiting patiently at home – or were dismissed at the time by those who fought as sentimental and lacking in understanding (Mr Sassoon, I’m looking at you here, with … Continue reading WWI: Fifty two months, fifty two posts – 2 – Scars Upon My Heart